Acupuncture for displaced and incarcerated populations

 

 

How can acupuncture help communities who are incarcerated, displaced, imprisoned or facing migration?

Since the late 20th century immigrants, international aid groups trained refugees and disaster relief workers in acupuncture in Asia, Africa, and the Americas.  Prisons have even trained their correctional staff in how to apply basic acupuncture techniques.  Over the past few years, over 70,000 refugees have sought asylum at the US-Mexico Border, where acupuncture is offered for migrants currently living within shelters, church sanctuaries and refugee camps.

As part of the City of Las Cruces’ Rememberance and Return week amidst a program of activities focusing on Julie Otsuka’s book When the Emperor Was Divine, this free webinar offers a brief history of the use of acupuncture internationally in addressing community trauma for refugees, prisoners and other displaced populations, and how acupuncture is being incorporated into prison and migrant care in New Mexico and the borderlands.

This was part of the City of Las Cruces’ Rememberance and Return week amidst a program of activities focusing on Julie Otsuka’s book When the Emperor Was Divine on the Japanese Internment Camps in the United States during World War 2.

Our presentation was just one of many in February and March. See the full program here: https://vimeo.com/showcase/8178209

Thanks so much to the City of Las Cruces for inviting us to be part of this community educational month on such an important topic for New Mexico, and for the US.

About the 2021 Big Read program

In February and March of 2021, the Las Cruces community came together to explore When the Emperor was Divine by Julie Otsuka for the Big Read.   This award-winning title shares the experiences of a Japanese American family incarcerated by the United States government following the attack on Pearl Harbor that precipitated the United States’ entry into World War II.

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