Barefoot Clinics voted Best Acupuncturist

The Barefoot Acupuncture Movement’s project in the borderlands has been voted Best Acupuncturist in the Mesilla Valley in 2021 by the Las Cruces Bulletin.

 

Our central clinic in Las Cruces, NM is currently located at Families and Youth, INC at 1320 S. Solano. Appointments are available online or by calling 575-312-6569.

 

We are especially excited by this news, as the network of Crossroads’ Barefoot Acupuncture clinics offers care for the poorest of the poor in the borderlands. Most clinics are free for the public, and located within sectors of community mental healthcare that are not often recognized nor featured in the headlines or within the news. We consider these courageous, bold, and selfless front-line workers—all students of the Barefoot Acupuncture Movement—serving the regions most vulnerable populations, to be well deserving as the area’s “best.” Thank you for your tireless work!

 

This new year marks the 10th year anniversary since our project was founded in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico in 2011 in collaboration with regional community health workers to respond to violence, and provide assistance for survivors of trauma. Our clinic in Las Cruces started in 2012 in the downtown mall, and has since created a network of dozens of community clinics offering acupuncture for the homeless, for refugees, and for the working class of the border region.

 

The foundation of our mission of making healthcare accessible to people of all income levels comes out of building resilience among the region’s existing community workforce. As a 501-c-3 non-profit organization, Crossroads (DBA Barefoot Acupuncture Movement) works through collaborative partnerships with health workers and community leaders on the front-lines of providing care for the poorest of poor. Groups we work with include Community of Hope, Amador Health Center, Families and Youth, INC, the Catholic Charities in Cd Juarez, Mexico, refugee shelters and addictions and recovery and harm reduction centers located throughout the region.

 

To support these groups, Crossroads has trained more than 400 health workers to establish and sustain their own community-supported health services along the U.S.-Mexico border and in Latin America. In this time, our programs provided over 90,000 acupuncture treatments, primarily offered by volunteers at no cost to patients lacking access to basic healthcare. We accomplished this while operating Crossroads Acupuncture Clinic in Las Cruces, New Mexico, a community clinic that has provided 35,000 acupuncture treatments using a sliding scale and insurance billing model.

 

For over a decade, we carefully worked to support existing humanitarian aid projects, mobilizing our volunteer network to assist migrants on the U.S.-Mexico border, providing treatment to survivors of the El Paso, Texas 2019 mass shooting to address trauma, addiction, and a variety of other health issues in their communities. We have expanded this model of teaching people to care for their own people in recent years within indigenous healthcare in the greater New Mexico, including the Navaho and Qʼeqchiʼ tribes, and among small farmers in Central America. You can learn more about our current fundraising initiative will support disaster response for Hurricane lota survivors in Nicaragua on our new Barefoot Acupuncture Movement website.

 

This is not the first time that Crossroads Acupuncture has been featured in the Las Cruces Bulletin. Jess Williams wrote a recent article about our expanding global project “Barefoot Acupuncture: Moving healthcare’s needle globally,” where you can read about what we are doing internationally to replicate our model in underserved areas in the world as humanitarian aid response and to support community development. Zak Hanson’s “East Meets Southwest” December 2013 article within the Bulletin featured the founding of our non-profit organization.

 

Social workers and other community health providers can learn more about our acudetox training program at barefootacupuncturemovement.com.

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